Earliest Amoebae Live Today

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Earliest amoebae live today, according to a report in Science, vol 304, p44, 2 April 2004. Alexander Schmidt and colleagues at the Friedrich Schiller University, Jena have studied amber chips believed to be 100 million years old and found they contained preserved amoebae – single celled organisms that live in water and are very rarely fossilised because they are mostly water themselves. The researchers comment: "They represent the earliest occurrence of four species of freshwater amoebae in the Phryganellidae and Centropyxidae families that live on today."

Editorial Comment: Evolution is sometimes summarised as "amoeba to man" but this discovery only confirms the book of Genesis which says 10 times in the first chapter that God created living organisms to multiply according to their kinds, i.e. amoeba to amoeba only. (Ref. amoeba, amber, fossil)

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